Trenchless sewer repairs have been a life saver for many of our clients in the Phoenix area, but trenchless sewer repairs and trenchless sewer replacements have been saving clients thousands of dollars nationwide and we came really close to losing the ability to perform trenchless repairs because the UPC was set to make trenchless repairs against plumbing code. I literally freaked out when I got the email from PHCP Pros, which is a plumbing, heating and cooling professionals community forum that let me know 4 more changes were coming to the UPC (Uniform Plumbing Code) from the 2018 version to the 2021 version. As you can imagine, we watch plumbing code updates like our lives depend on it, because they do. I instantly jumped on the article to prepare myself for upcoming updates to have my heart fall to the floor to read.

“These code changes will appear in the 2021 edition of the International Plumbing Code. Because it is possible for modifications to be made during the final hearing process and because there were multiple changes made to some code sections, the final edited version may be slightly different than what was in the actual code change proposal. Refer to the 2021 International Plumbing Code for the final version of any code changes.The proposed new code language is underlined. The text proposed to be deleted is stricken through. The proposed changes are followed by the proponent’s published reason statements, and occasionally by my comments when noted.

Code Change: 2021 UPC Code, Chapter 7, Sanitary Drainage, Section 715.3, Existing SewersAdd new text as follows:715.3 Existing Sewers. Replacement of existing building sewer and building storm sewers using trenchless methodology and materials shall be installed in accordance with ASTM F1216,ASTM F2561, ASTM F2599, or ASTM F3240. Cast-iron soil pipes and fittings shall not be repaired or replaced by using this method aboveground or below ground. Replacement using cured-in-place pipe liners shall not be used on collapsed piping or when the existing piping is compromised.Proponents’ reason statement:The wording was changed to more appropriately reflect the current industry use of “rehabilitation” rather than trenchless, which is included in the title of all appropriate standards. The technology has progressed and many other standards are in use today that are needed to ensure performance and water tightness. In addition, minimal inspection requirements are needed and should be required. Finally, restrictions should be in a separate section.“Out of this entire section all I could see was “Cast-iron soil pipes and fittings shall not be repaired or replaced by using this method aboveground or below ground.”Is Trenchless really going to be illegal? For two reasons we were on the phone right away with one of the leading suppliers of trenchless equipment, 1. Our clients deserve to have trenchless as an option for their homes and businesses. Many people do not want to or simply cannot afford to have their homes and businesses torn apart, needing concrete work at bare minimum and most often requiring new flooring, vacancy of the home or the shut down of business. 2. I’ve invested what seems like a billion dollars in specialized trenchless equipment as well as training and certifications, my investment of time and money could be rendered useless. 

Trenchless sewer repairs and trenchless sewer replacements are not always the right solution and that is why they require a certified, not just a licensed plumbing contractor to make those repairs, to ensure that they are done correctly and have a warranty but when trenchless is the right solution, it is a game changer on savings and repair time.

We get to keep Trenchless!IAPMO Grant’s Nassco’s Petition

I cannot tell you how impressed I was with the swiftness of the response that I received from HammerHead Trenchless and how grateful I was that so many incredible people stood up for what was right and I got the email confirming that Trenchless is here to stay and will be code compliant. The company that decides on what is plumbing code or not, IAPMO was petitioned by Nassco to reconsider their position on trenchless. IAPMO is who every plumber in the United States has to meet the requirements of. They are the ones who are responsible ultimately for the health of the nation and keep the standards of the plumbing profession high to maintain the health and security of clients across the US. This was the email I received, and I am so grateful to the non-profit community at Nassco for presenting the case for trenchless sewer repairs to remain code compliant saving this incredible technology for not just our clients but clients nationwide that can benefit from these incredible trenchless technologies. {S0529229.1} 1 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE For more information contact director@nassco.orgIAPMO Grants NASSCO’s Petitions Regarding UPC Section 715.3 (Frederick, Maryland, February 27, 2020) –NASSCO has spent nearly two years advocating for the removal of language in the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC) that banned the use of cured-in place pipe and other trenchless technologies to replace cast iron soil pipes and fittings. On February 26, 2020, in response to its petitions, NASSCO received a decision from the IAMPO Board of Directors that reversed this ban. The prohibitive language for existing sewers was included in Section 715.3 of the 2018 Edition of the UPC and the 2021 Edition of the UPC as stated: Replacement of existing building sewer and building storm sewers using trenchless methodology and materials shall be installed in accordance with ASTM F1216. Cast-iron soil pipes and fittings shall not be repaired or replaced by using this method aboveground or below ground. Replacement using cured-in-place pipe liners shall not be used on collapsed piping or when the existing piping is compromised. NASSCO is thankful for the persistence and dedication of NASSCO members and its Lateral Committee and Plumbing Code Workgroup who contributed substantial time and effort throughout this process. They engaged with IAPMO’s Technical Committee and Standards Council and followed the due process procedures in IAPMO’s regulations that are available to parties interested in its code setting process. In response to NASSCO’s petitions and efforts, IAPMO’s Board of Directors determined that extraordinary circumstances required intervention to protect the integrity of the codes and standards development process. In granting NASSCO’s petitions, the Board rendered Section 715.3 of the code as follows:

2018 UPC 715.3 Existing Sewers. Replacement Of existing building sewer and building storm sewers using trenchless methodology and materials shall be installed in accordance with ASTM F1216. 2021 UPC 715.3 Existing Sewers. Replacement of existing building sewer and building storm sewers using trenchless methodology and materials shall be installed in accordance with ASTM F1216, ASTM F2561, ASTM F2599 or ASTM F3240.NASSCO would like to give special thanks to members Kaleel Rahaim (NASSCO Technical Advisory Council Member), Joanne Carroll (Principal, Subtegic Group, Inc.), Tom Bowman (Director of Technology & Licensing, NuFlow Technologies), Michael Jennings (VP of Operations, {S0529229.1} 2 Rotoco), and NASSCO’s legal counsel, SkarlatosZonarich, for their hard work and dedication throughout this process and for their continued support of our industry. “We have come together as trenchless technology providers and have been unified through the representation of NASSCO to have this prohibition removed,” said Carroll, who heads up NASSCO’s Plumbing Code Workgroup. “Now, we must continue to build awareness and offer educational opportunities for the quality application of trenchless technology within the plumbing segment of the wastewater market. I’m so thankful for the support given throughout our industry and for NASSCO stepping up to support not only their membership, but all service providers, to enable the opportunity to provide technically sound solutions that minimize disruption when pipelines need repair or replacement.” In addition to setting standards for the assessment, maintenance and rehabilitation of underground infrastructure, NASSCO’s mission is to ensure the continued acceptance and growth of trenchless technologies. “While cured-in-place pipe technology has been used successfully for over 40 years,” shared Bowman, “the manufacturing businesses providing these solutions have, for the most part, operated in their own silos in the process of competing for customers and market share. While this code process was unfortunate and caught our industry by surprise, it has been most refreshing to put aside our individual interests and work together for a shared purpose.” NASSCO’s vision is to increase the awareness of aging underground infrastructure and to provide viable solutions through education, technical resources and industry advocacy. This can only be accomplished when competitors and others aligned to trenchless technologies come together to do what is best for the entire industry, as they did in this case. “I am often asked what value NASSCO brings to its members, and this outcome is a perfect example of what can happen when our members take a stand for what’s right,” said Sheila Joy, NASSCO’s Executive Director. “As a 501 c (6) not-for-profit trade association, it is NASSCO’s responsibility to represent the entire industry fairly and objectively. Advocacy programs such as this one, along with government relations activity to secure funding for underground infrastructure, research studies on employee safety, workforce development and other initiatives that create opportunities for our members and keep our communities safe are what NASSCO is all about.“We appreciate IAPMO for providing procedures to voice concerns regarding their code and their Board of Directors’ attention to and careful consideration of our concerns. I encourage all of us to get involved and have a voice in the development of these important codes.“ # # # {S0529229.1} 3

About NASSCO: Established in 1976 to represent contractors, NASSCO, Inc., a 501 c (6) not-for-profit organization, sets standards for the assessment, maintenance and rehabilitation of underground infrastructure and assures the continued acceptance and growth of trenchless (“no-dig”) technologies. Its vision is to build awareness for the need to repair aging underground infrastructure through education such as NASSCO’s Pipeline Assessment Certification Program (PACP®), Inspector Training Certification Program (ITCP®) and other training programs; through technical resources including publications andspecification guidelines; and through advocacy to secure funding of underground systems and protect the future of trenchless technologies. NASSCO is driven by members across North and South America who are involved in keeping underground sewer systems operating at optimum performance. NASSCO members include contractors who do the work, engineers who specify technologies, system owners (municipalities and other government organizations) who are responsible for the operation of their underground systems, companies that manufacture or supply equipment, supplies or services, and individuals, educational institutions and other organizations with interests that align with NASSCO’s goal to serve as the industry source for education, technical resources and advocacy. For more information please visit nassco.org

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